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Here are some more things developers love hearing from their non-developer co-workers.

“This change shouldn’t take more than a few minutes.”

Thanks, marketing coordinator! I appreciate you telling me that this fix on the site won’t take long in spite of the fact that you have no idea that the website was built in COBOL that someone hacked together when you were five years old.

“Let’s have a meeting!”

Oh man, developers love nothing more than when non-developers ask them to have meetings… about everything! Have to make a decision on colors? Let’s have a meeting! Want to try to convince your team to build it in WordPress? Sounds like a great way to spend three hours I could also use to build that product that’s a month behind. We should schedule a meeting to figure out when we should have this meeting!

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • 11 Things Developers Love Hearing From Non-Developer Co-Workers
  • #Coding/Programming
  • Author: Sonya Sepahban
  • Steve Blank's Customer Development
  • #Startup
  • Author: Sonya Sepahban
  • Steve Blank's Customer Development
  • #Startup
  • Author: WMN Team
  • CoWork space & Ecosystem for women led ventures
  • #leadership

Along with Facebook, Microsoft and Apple, these companies are in a race to become our “personal assistant.” They want to wake us in the morning, have their artificial intelligence software guide us through our days and never quite leave our sides. They aspire to become the repository for precious and private items, our calendars and contacts, our photos and documents. They intend for us to turn unthinkingly to them for information and entertainment while they catalogue our intentions and aversions. Google Glass and the Apple Watch prefigure the day when these companies implant their artificial intelligence in our bodies. Brin has mused, “Perhaps in the future, we can attach a little version of Google that you just plug into your brain.”

More than any previous coterie of corporations, the tech monopolies aspire to mold humanity into their desired image of it. They think they have the opportunity to complete the long merger between man and machine — to redirect the trajectory of human evolution. How do I know this? In annual addresses and town hall meetings, the founding fathers of these companies often make big, bold pronouncements about human nature — a view that they intend for the rest of us to adhere to. Page thinks the human body amounts to a basic piece of code: “Your program algorithms aren’t that complicated,” he says. And if humans function like computers, why not hasten the day we become fully cyborg?

To take another grand theory, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has exclaimed his desire to liberate humanity from phoniness, to end the dishonesty of secrets. “The days of you having a different image for your work friends or co-workers and for the other people you know are probably coming to an end pretty quickly,” he has said. “Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity.” Of course, that’s both an expression of idealism and an elaborate justification for Facebook’s business model.

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • Perspective | How Silicon Valley is erasing your individuality
  • #Startup

Dean was intrigued enough to lend his “20 percent” — the portion of work hours every Google employee is expected to contribute to programs outside his or her core job — to the project. Pretty soon, he suggested to Ng that they bring in another colleague with a neuroscience background, Greg Corrado. (In graduate school, Corrado was taught briefly about the technology, but strictly as a historical curiosity. “It was good I was paying attention in class that day,” he joked to me.) In late spring they brought in one of Ng’s best graduate students, Quoc Le, as the project’s first intern. By then, a number of the Google engineers had taken to referring to Project Marvin by another name: Google Brain.

Since the term “artificial intelligence” was first coined, at a kind of constitutional convention of the mind at Dartmouth in the summer of 1956, a majority of researchers have long thought the best approach to creating A.I. would be to write a very big, comprehensive program that laid out both the rules of logical reasoning and sufficient knowledge of the world. If you wanted to translate from English to Japanese, for example, you would program into the computer all of the grammatical rules of English, and thenthe entirety of definitions contained in the Oxford English Dictionary, and then all of the grammatical rules of Japanese, as well as all of the words in the Japanese dictionary, and only after all of that feed it a sentence in a source language and ask it to tabulate a corresponding sentence in the target language. You would give the machine a language map that was, as Borges would have had it, the size of the territory. This perspective is usually called “symbolic A.I.” — because its definition of cognition is based on symbolic logic — or, disparagingly, “good old-fashioned A.I.”

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • The Great A.I. Awakening
  • #Leadership

Crunchbase does a great job of explaining the ins and outs of a typical fundraising process with their fictitious chicken drone delivery startup.

We often get asked about the ins and outs of fundraising, and we have referred startups to a lot of resources. So we thought we should share this with all of you.

  • Author: Sonya Sepahban
  • How Early Seed Funding Works (by Crunchbase 9/5/17)
  • #Angel/Seed

Sebastian Thrun once lamented, “In education people just have these irrational beliefs in these 200 year old brands. That’s the slowest thing holding back innovation.” For schools that are only 5 years old, the collective reputation is as important as any individual schools’ message. If there’s fraud, if there’s betrayal of students, if there’s profiteering, a single school may suffer in the short term but eventually it’ll hurt everyone. Splitting apart the best programs from the at-risk ones is one of the reasons CIRR brought so many competitors together.

EQUIP, the Obama-era initiative, is an experiment allowing students to take out government loans to pay for bootcamp education. If scaled (and so far it’s barely starting up) the program will undermine the basic premise of bootcamps: That education should be clearly ROI-positive for students with schools directly held accountable when it’s not. Government-backed student loans, however, shift focus from outcomes to government certification. This is the road for-profit colleges went down generation ago, turning cheap loans into thousands in personal debt and unmeasurable degrees. EQUIP may be a test but its outcome would be to distort incentives and end other innovation.

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • An insider’s take on the future of coding bootcamps
  • #Coding/Programming

“Good Design”

Most people think good design is directly related to beauty. They’re wrong. Good design is about executing a desired outcome through visual communication. Did you notice how ugly our first slide is? This is intentional.

We want people to react viscerally to how messy and uncomfortable the problem is.

We’ve also used an iconic, relatable image to communicate it. Every investor knows that Mark Zuckerberg is a notoriously poor dresser, so this tiny visual joke helps us develop a rapport in addition to articulating the problem our product is about to solve.

 

The Money Shot

Nope, not actual money, because you’re probably not making any yet — we’re talking about your product. Regardless of the story you’ve decided to tell, it’s almost certainly going to include an explanation of what you actually do.

You don’t have time to weave a full demo into a 3 minute pitch, so your goal here is to showcase why your solution is at least 10 times better than all of the alternatives you’ve described thus far.

In our case, we contrast Mylo with two extremely rudimentary versions of the same thing, and show how our solution is more expansive, beautiful, personalized, user-friendly and high tech.

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • How to Design a Pitch Deck: Lessons from a Seasoned Founder
  • #Startup

(1) The proper goal of hard work is not personal gain, but organizational contribution, adds Sandberg. “I don’t see that many people coming into the workplace asking what they can do for the company,” she says. “Ask what you can do. I promise you will get mentors. You will get sponsors. You will get results. You will get promotions. You will get opportunities by contributing.”

(2)  “If you try to plan out your career, it’s going to be boring. You’re going to miss all the good stuff, because all the good stuff hasn’t been invented yet,” says Sandberg. “You want to have a really long-run dream and you want to have a short-run plan. And that short-run plan, it’s not about what you accomplish, especially in the early days. It’s about what you help other people accomplish and about what you learn. You invest in yourself. You invest in the success of your teams.”

  • Author: Arsames Qajar
  • Sheryl Sandberg: Develop Your Voice, Not Your Brand
  • #Startup
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