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  • by JoinIN Team
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship at CSUN Fast Pitch
  • #startup

We like to complain about work, but it plays an important role in our happiness. Work, even the most mundane work, helps us feed our families, put roofs over our heads and connect with other people. 

Ideally, we will find work that has meaning to us. But not everybody can quit their day job and pursue charity work or join Teach for America. As a result, it’s important that we find ways to find meaning in our day-to-day work.

Studies show that we get satisfaction from all kinds of work — not just our dream job. Yale researchers studied custodians who worked in a hospital. Far from seeing the drudgery of their jobs, the janitors had unofficially broadened the definition of hospital custodial work. Many of them viewed their work as including providing comfort to patients, helping families find their way around the hospital and providing a clean, pleasant environment for doctors and nurses to do their work and for patients to heal.

Even people who do telephone solicitation — viewed by many as the bottom of the career ladder — can find satisfaction in work. Wharton professor Adam Grant arranged for a student to talk about the difference his scholarship made to his life. After the talk, the phone solicitors hired to raise money for the school’s scholarship fund raised almost double the money as they had before. The work and pay hadn’t changed, but their sense of purpose had.

In a column about Why You Hate Work, Christine Porath, a Georgetown associate professor,  and Tony Schwartz, chief executive of a consulting firm called The Energy Project, found that the jobs that make us happiest are those that include four characteristics: renewal, value, focus and purpose.

  • Renewal: Employees who take a break every 90 minutes report a 30 percent higher level of focus than those who take no breaks or just one during the day. They also report a nearly 50 percent greater capacity to think creatively and a 46 percent higher level of health and well-being. The more hours people work beyond 40 — and the more continuously they work — the worse they feel, and the less engaged they become. By contrast, feeling encouraged by one’s supervisor to take breaks increases by nearly 100 percent people’s likelihood to stay with any given company, and also doubles their sense of health and well-being.
  • Value: Feeling cared for by one’s supervisor has a more significant impact on people’s sense of trust and safety than any other behavior by a leader. Employees who say they have more supportive supervisors are 1.3 times as likely to stay with the organization and are 67 percent more engaged.
  • Focus: Only 20 percent of respondents said they were able to focus on one task at a time at work, but those who could were 50 percent more engaged. Similarly, only one-third of respondents said they were able to effectively prioritize their tasks, but those who did were 1.6 times better able to focus on one thing at a time.
  • Purpose: Employees who derive meaning and significance from their work were more than three times as likely to stay with their organizations — the highest single impact of any variable in our survey. These employees also reported 1.7 times higher job satisfaction and they were 1.4 times more engaged at work.
  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How to Be Happy
  • #Leadership
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • New Trend? Lead with Culture
  • #general business

Many of those started off as a pitch, in a room, in front of a few key decision-makers, most of whom were white men (89 percent by recent figures, as high as 94 percent, according to Lisa Wang, founder and CEO of the female entrepreneur network SheWorx).

And the way venture capital often works is that the small number of big firms choose a founder that they like, invest money, take seats on the new company’s board, and provide a halo of other services including advice, mentorship, and job prospects.

When I interviewed Steve Jurvetson earlier this year, he talked about something called a "homophily bias," which means that people like people who are like them, and that yes, venture capitalists have a tendency to pick founders and employees who are a lot like them.

 

see - http://www.businessinsider.com/ellen-pao-explains-the-root-cause-of-silicon-valleys-bro-culture-2017-11?utm_content=bufferb38bd&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer-bi

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Why discrimination in venture capital runs deep
  • #Startup

Why should we care whether the teaching force reflects the demographics of the student body? A growing body of literature suggests that outcomes such as test scores, attendance, and suspension rates are affected by the demographic match between teachers and students.[3]

Minority students often perform better on standardized tests, have improved attendance, and are suspended less frequently (which may suggest either different degrees of behavior or different treatment, or both) when they have at least one same-race teacher.

 

All of these outcomes, however, are measured in the short run, and might not be sustained over time. Until recently, there existed no studies of the effects of exposure to same-race teachers on longer-run outcomes. A recent paper[4], however, provides important new evidence on precisely this question. Gershenson, Hart, Lindsay, and Papageorge demonstrate that if a black male student has at least one black teacher in the third, fourth, or fifth grade, he is significantly less likely to drop out of high school and more likely to aspire to attend a four-year college (as proxied by taking a college entrance exam). They find that these effects are especially pronounced for economically disadvantaged black male students. For instance, they find that a disadvantaged black male’s exposure to at least one black teacher in elementary school reduces his probability of dropping out of high school by nearly 40 percent. This estimated effect is not just statistically significant, but also highly educationally relevant.

One thing that makes this new study so compelling is that the authors show that the results are present in multiple settings, using multiple research designs. In one part of the study, Gershenson, Hart, Lindsay, and Papageorge make use of administrative data in North Carolina, and study what happens when the demographic composition of teachers in elementary schools varies from cohort to cohort. In another part of the study, they investigate the effects of being randomly assigned to a same-race teacher as part of Tennessee’s Project STAR class size experiment.[5]

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • The importance of a diverse teaching force
  • #Other

Author, activist, and former tech CEO Elissa Shevinsky was one of the early voices who dared to speak out about the female-hostile culture of venture capital and Silicon Valley. In 2013 Shevinsky published a viral piece called “That’s It—I’m Finished Defending Sexism in Tech,” which describes her trajectory from being a “get things done” entrepreneur to becoming a leading feminist voice in technology and beyond. In 2015 she collected the stories and essays of 19 female veterans of the tech industry into Lean Out, one of the first books to begin peeling back the layers of hypocrisy, secrecy, protectionism, and denial about sexual harassment across the industry.

The book proposes this simple but radical solution: Women should not try to adapt to the male-centric corporate world, instead women should “lean out” and create their own companies. “I’ve figured out a way to create safe space for myself in tech,” wrote Shevinsky.

In a recent conversation, we discussed how the culture of overwork contributes to the problem of misogyny in many companies, and about how the singular focus on growth and profit drowns out ethical concerns that in the long run ultimately ruins companies. We also spoke about how feminism has said all it can, and yet things don’t seem to be getting better. And we discussed how a hostile workplace for women often indicates that a company has other ethical issues as well.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • For Tech’s Deepest Problems, Women Are The Canary In The Data Mine
  • #Startup

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • HP Furthers Its Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion With Its Latest LGBTQ-Focused Initiative
  • #Marketing

Medium piece by Zat Rana does  a good job of focusing us on our approach to work, and how to enjoy it more!

  • by JoinIN Team
  • Work according to Alan Watts
  • #General Business

Scott Stein helps you choose the right iPhone for you.  

  • by JoinIN Team
  • Which iPhone?
  • #Other

Long-time critic of Tesla, Bob Lutz: "There is no secret sauce in Tesla. They use the same lithium-ion batteries as everybody else."

Is it the age-old battle between a mature established business and a disruptor? or is there some truth to it?

You be the judge. 

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Tesla: Disruptive or Failing?
  • #general business

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • 95 Ways to find your first customers for customer development or your first sale
  • #Marketing

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Hacking Ecommerce Growth: Supreme Streetwear’s Insane Success
  • #Marketing

So it was that da Vinci learned to challenge conventional wisdom, ignoring the dusty scholasticism and medieval dogmas that had accumulated in the millennia since the decline of classical science. He was, by his own words, a disciple of experience and experiment–“Leonardo da Vinci, disscepolo della sperientia,” he once signed himself. That approach to problem-solving was nothing short of revolutionary, foreshadowing the scientific method developed more than a century later by Francis Bacon and Galileo Galilei. And it elevated da Vinci beyond even the smartest of his peers. “Talent hits a target that no one else can hit,” wrote the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer. “Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • What Makes a Genius? The World's Greatest Minds Have One Thing in Common
  • #Leadership

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  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Elon Musk opens up on love life, traumatic childhood, Tesla goals
  • #Startup

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • 10 Best Practices for Designing User-Friendly Forms (on Mobile!)
  • #Design

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Celebrities Teaching Courses? How Much Hollywood Glitz Should Colleges Use in Their Online Courses.
  • #Other

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Microsoft reports modest diversity gains, boosted by LinkedIn workforce and hiring initiatives
  • #Human Resources

Direct link to the pdf study - http://www.kaporcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/TechLeavers2017.pdf

 

** "Workplace culture drives turnover, significantly affecting the retention of underrepresented groups, and costing the industry more than $16 billion each year."

 
 
  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Tech Leavers - Kapor Center for Social Impact
  • #Venture Capital
  • by Jared Rouppet
  • Hire LA Youth
  • #Human Resources

At Tesla, as at many tech companies, gallows humor prevailed among some of the women. There was a sense that the male executives had little understanding of the challenges women faced at the company. One former Tesla employee told me that women made up less than ten per cent of her working group; at one point, there were actually more men named Matt in the group than there were women. This became a source of rueful comedy. One male colleague quipped that they should change the sign reading “Women’s Room” to “Matt’s Room.”

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The same year, Whitney Wolfe, a co-founder of Tinder, filed a lawsuit after one of her fellow co-founders, whom she had previously dated, allegedly began harassing her. She was twenty-four at the time. The C.E.O., who was the accused harasser’s best friend, pushed her out of the company. In one text message, the ex-boyfriend, apparently fearing that she was seeing someone else, allegedly wrote, “You prefer to social climb middle aged Muslim pigs that stand for nothing.” (The lawsuit was settled with no admission of wrongdoing. Wolfe is now the C.E.O. of the networking app Bumble.) A year later, in 2015, a former Facebook employee named Chia Hong sued the company, claiming, among other things, that her boss had repeatedly admonished her for pursuing a career rather than staying home with her kids. (Hong later dropped her suit.)

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Almost half the women who go into technology eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who depart. The turnover of women and minorities, according to a 2017 study on “tech leavers,” costs Silicon Valley more than sixteen billion dollars each year. The same study showed that, in almost sixty per cent of cases, employees who had been sexually harassed said that the harassment contributed to their decision to change professions. The primary differences between the experiences of employees who left and those who remained, according to another study, had to do with negative perceptions of the workplace environment, unfairness, and lack of opportunity.

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Sexual harassment wasn’t established as a legal concept until the nineteen-seventies, when two cases brought by African-American women against their male bosses forced the courts to confront the issue. In 1977, Paulette Barnes, a payroll clerk at the Environmental Protection Agency who was fired after refusing her supervisor’s sexual advances, sued the agency. The case went to the Supreme Court, which, in 1986, ruled that sexual harassment was a violation of the Civil Rights Act. Still, the idea didn’t take hold in the public consciousness until Anita Hill testified before Congress, in 1991, about the harassment she had suffered while working for the Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas at the Department of Education and, later, at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Thomas was confirmed, but in the five years after Hill’s testimony the number of sexual-harassment filings more than doubled.

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • The Tech Industry’s Gender-Discrimination Problem
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Top Women Investors Are Answering the VC Boys' Club With One of Their Own
  • #Venture Capital
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Why Office Culture Matters
  • #General Business

How are you personally working to promote diversity and inclusion in the VC industry, such as funding more companies led by underrepresented minorities and helping people from those groups get hired and promoted as VCs?

My firm, Greylock Partners, and I make an extra effort to meet with diverse entrepreneurs, and we invest in them more widely through our Discovery Fund [which does smaller, seed-stage deals]. We also create communities that help entrepreneurs solve various problems—everything from design to technology and prototyping—and we make sure those communities themselves are diverse.

Basically, for everything we do, we ask the question, “Are we being inclusive?” That includes everything from partner recruitment—which we talk about every month, even though we only hire a new partner every two years, because we’re a small group—to how the whole firm operates. We can’t always get it right, but if you’re asking the question, you’re always trying, and we think that at least puts you on the right learning path to change.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Reid Hoffman: It’s time to change Silicon Valley culture
  • #Venture Capital

Modern venture capital was initiated by French-born American Georges Doriot in 1946, who founded the American Research and Development Corporation (ARDC), the world’s first publicly owned venture capital firm. ARDC’s first major success story happened when its 1957 investment of $70,000 (about $630,000 in today’s dollars) in Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) became worth more than $38 million at IPO in 1966 (about $270 million in today’s dollars) — a 500 multiple and 100 percent IRR for the fund.

Since then, venture capital has not stopped finding new ideas to provide an edge for the success of entrepreneurs and themselves. We listed here some of the most significant innovations in financing startups, some of which are not strictly “VC.”

 

See Techcrunch article - https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/09/70-years-of-vc-innovation/?ncid=rss&utm_source=tcfbpage&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Techcrunch+%28TechCrunch%29&utm_content=FaceBook&sr_share=facebook

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • 70 years of VC innovation
  • #Venture Capital

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Who Controls AI in Higher Ed, And Why It Matters (Part 1)
  • #Other

Even though FB clones are crushing them in total numbers: https://www.statista.com/chart/10558/daus-instagram-stories-whatsapp-status-snapchat/

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Infographic: Snapchat Cements Its Must-Have Status Among U.S. Teens
  • #Marketing

The U.S. is in 22nd position and its lack of paid-maternity leave is one possible reason it trails other developed countries. Along with Papua New Guinea, the U.S. is the only country worldwide that doesn't offer new mothers paid maternity leave.

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Infographic: The Best And Worst Countries For Women Worldwide
  • #Other

https://jigsaw.google.com/

Jigsaw -

In terms of what technology is most interesting to me at the moment, it’s probably looking at whether we can understand online toxicity. Can we break down toxicity into its components of what makes people want to leave an [online] conversation—is it obscene language? Is it insults? Is it threats? Is it identity-based attacks? And they’re all actually different types of bad speech, and different communities online may care about one and not the other. And the more we can define the models, the more useful it will ultimately be to creating inclusive conversations.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Meet the woman who’s battling hate speech, censorship, and extremism online (and off)
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How we can end sexual harassment at work
  • #Other

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  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • WeWork Is Launching a Grade School for Budding Entrepreneurs
  • #Other

Erin Oxhorn-Gilpin, a first and second grade multi-subject teacher at Northlake Hills Elementary School, has been selected as a 2018 California State Teacher of the Year.

“Erin is a true champion for every child and makes the most of every moment with her kids.  She brings a passion for teaching and the teaching profession to Northlake Hills,” Principal Erin Augusta said in a statement.  “We are beyond proud of Erin and her well-deserved honor.”

Oxhorn-Gilpin was one of five teachers selected by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson as 2018 California Teachers of the Year.